My Favorite GS
 
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My Favorite GS


franklemire
(@franklemire)
Estimable Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 216
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It was not an actual car just a 'what if?' custom model of mine

 

gshall1
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My line of thinking was what would Jim Hall had done if his Chaparral 2 wasn't ready for the beginning of the season in 1965 but he wanted to run something.

 


john3976
(@john3976)
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Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 549
 

Doubtful that Jim Hall would have been able to get a hold of one of only two roadster Grand Sport Corvettes as they were already spoken for and by this time they were far behind in development as the 427 Cobras would eat the Corvette Grand Sports lunch. The front end design flaw of the C-2 Corvettes was just to much to over come, for one the front end mass was just to big and the front end lift at speed resulted in having to have all those cut outs in the hood so the air could evacuate from under the front end of the car. Also many articles and Corvette fans like to point to the 1963 Nassau race and make the claim that the Grand Sport was a cobra killer, the truth is the Grand Sport Corvettes were faster than the 289 Cobras but the big block Cobras had the Grand Sport Corvettes covered. At that 1963 Nassau race was a prototype Cobra big block a 390 C.I. engine and the race it was entered in that week in Nassau at the end of the first lap Ken Miles pulled out a half a straight lead over those Corvette Grand Sports, unfortunately the engine failed in that race on the big block Cobra. 

Interesting story:

Texas oilman and one-time race car team owner, John Mecom (Mecom Racing Team) told Autoweek in an interview that Duntov built half-a-dozen Grand Sports and sold them all to Mecom Racing, to “make it legal.” Mecom also claimed that he had all six cars in his Houston shop at least once. He said, “I’d swear on a stack of Bibles there were six.” This totally flies against every Corvette history book.

Mecom went on to say that he believes that Senior VP of Design, Bill Mitchell took the sixth. Why? Mecom said, “Bill Mitchell got hold of one and I’m sure he made a styling car out of it.” No such car has been accounted for. All of the Corvette history books are wrong Mecom said, “No one ever interviewed me for those books.” One Grand Sport book author contacted Mecom after the book’s publication. Mecom said, “He told me he didn’t interview me because he’d already talked to the experts.” The Autoweek story closes with a statement from Mecom’s friend, automotive artist Bill Neale. “There was a framed photograph of the Hobby Airport shop in John’s trophy room, and you could see, if you looked, six Grand Sports.”

There is documented history of a total of six Corvette Grand Sports with number six being ordered to be placed into storage unfinished (as was Grand Sport #5) so the real question is did Duntov quietly finish Grand Sport number six and was it taken by Bill Mitchell and used as a styling exercise, after all the Corvette Grand Sport project was never officially approved by the GM board as Chevrolet General Manager, Semon “Bunkie” Knudsen and Duntov were quietly building these cars. 

Alan Sevadjian is one of the owners of Duntov Motors and is licensed by GM to build continuation Grand Sport race cars. Sevadjian once owned Grand Sport #003. As a licensee, Sevadjian was able to get the definitive documentation concerning Grand Sport #006. Sevadjian was able to review a memo in the GM Heritage Center from R. J. Avery, Engineering Department to Duntov, dated January 29, 1963. The memo ordered; “Grand Sports #001 to #004 would be completed, ready to run, and stored at Twelve Mile Warehouse. Grand Sport #005 was incomplete and to be left, “as is” in “body-in-white” condition and stored. Grand Sport #006 was to be stored as a “birdcage assembled, with the majority of metal parts completed, with a few plastic panels completed.” Experimental tools for parts and miscellaneous fixtures were also stored. Body drawings were renamed, “Experimental Build.”

So if Grand Sport #5 was unfinished and ordered to be stored as such yet it was clearly finished and raced it is reasonable to believe that Grand Sport #6 could have also been finished but was snapped up by Bill Mitchell as a styling exercise and stored in some GM warehouse unrecognizable as one of the 6 Grand Sports or it could have been destroyed after Mitchell was finished with it.

It is kind of hard to call John Mecom a lair. 

 

This post was modified 4 months ago 2 times by john3976

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franklemire
(@franklemire)
Estimable Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 216
Topic starter  

As I said, this was only a 'what if' exercise that allowed me to add some 'aerodynamic' touches to a non-liveried white GS that I had acquired at a good price. White was Hall's color and making cars 'slippery' was his game, so it seemed a good fit.

As for actual history, I tend to believe John Mecom. 

 


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