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1963 Buick Riviera by Franklin Mint

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David Green
(@david-green)
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Continuing with the 1989 releases in the Classic Cars of the Sixties series, here is RH39, 1963 Buick Riviera by Franklin Mint in maroon.

 

 

P1110868
P1110869
P1110870
P1110872
P1110873
P1110874
P1110871

 


   
Pete Rovero, Frank Reed, John Kuvakas and 3 people reacted
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Christopher Moroni
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I always thought this was a decent looking "Riv"... but would look much better "sitting"  a bit lower.  🤔 🤔 🤔 🤨 🤨 


   
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Bob Jackman
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@chris I agree Chris. The model looks like a 4X4 IMO.


   
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Mark Lampariello
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Other than the ride height this is a quite the 1:43 execution for 1989-- great proportions, color and details.

Dare I attempt to correct the ride height?


   
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George Schire
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The very reason (and it's my opinion folks) that I don't like 1:43 scale models.  That along with their being "too small".  To my eyes, so much detail is lost because of that small(er) size.  I will always believe that "size matters" (LOL, in models guys :)) and 1:24 scale always got it right.  

George Schire
Oakdale, Minnesota


   
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John Kuvakas
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@georgeschire, I know a lot of folks think the same way as you do. And that's a discussion that could go on for days, and it should as we share our reasons for buying our little gems. But, to be fair, judging the 1/43 scale on models made in 1989 by a manufacturer whose quality was spotty at best and lacked consistency, at least in 1/43, might not be the best way to evaluate the scale. Many of the newer releases exhibit greater detail and higher fidelity than some of the models made in 1/24. No, most 1/43 models do not have opening features...but some do, and they do an amazing job at it. Check out this video. They may be too small for the preference of some. That's OK. We all have our own very valid reasons for collecting. But, they do not lack detail. At the higher end of 1/43, the greater detail and higher fidelity are what make them such a joy to own.

This post was modified 3 months ago by John Kuvakas

John Kuvakas
Warrenton, VA


   
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George Schire
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@jkuvakas, thank you so much for your kind and informative reply.  Actually, I'm aware that many newer 1:43 scale models feature incredible detail, as one of my cousins collects them.  Thing is though, it really does come down to personal preference, and I'm hung up on 1:24 scale as being the ideal size.  I've no doubt remained that way from my plastic 1:25 scale model days as a kid.  They were just a smaller than 1:24, but they were close.  Then I remember when Hot Wheels came on the scene several decades ago and they became all the rage, but not for me.  We are blessed to live in a world that allows all of us to have the choices we do, even in diecast.  

Smile

George Schire
Oakdale, Minnesota


   
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David Green
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Thanks JK. You have summed up my feelings well. I’ve added a few thoughts below.

I have models in scales ranging from 1/8th all the way down to 1/144 scale. To me, the biggest factors in accuracy are more to do with technology used and age of the model than scale. Some 1/64 models made currently are far superior in accuracy and features than 1/18th scale Bburagos fro 25 years ago. To me, nothing still beats 1/18 CCM and Exoto in the under $1000 range. I have settled my main collecting these days on 1/43 because the current detail on the best brands is superb and I have the ability to display a greater portion of my collection. Good on George for persisting in 1/24 but there are reasons that market has declined.

Accuracy is not always a factor in our collecting. My Dinky, Corgi, Tootsie, Matchbox etc are not that accurate but have the nostalgia factor that demands attention. Originality is the key here.

 


   
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John Kuvakas
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@david-green, thanks. I'm just starting to explore 1/64. Some of the Japanese makers are doing some incredible stuff!

John Kuvakas
Warrenton, VA


   
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Ed Davis
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@jkuvakas 

When it comes to diecast models in smaller scales, one should not forget about military models in 1/72 scale. I have several, airplanes, tanks, and other vehicles. The detail is often amazing. Occasionally I post pictures of them in the 1/64 and smaller section.

Ed Davis
Inverness, Illinois, USA


   
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Ed Davis
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@georgeschire 

I have a question for you. I remember back in the 1950s and early 1960s the 1/25 scale promotional models and kits from AMT, JoHan, and others.Then models started appearing in 1/24 scale. Monogram was the first company I remember in 1/24 scale. Others followed. Do you know why model companies switched from 1/25 to 1/24 scale?

Ed Davis
Inverness, Illinois, USA


   
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George Schire
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Posted by: @ed-davis

@georgeschire 

I have a question for you. I remember back in the 1950s and early 1960s the 1/25 scale promotional models and kits from AMT, JoHan, and others.Then models started appearing in 1/24 scale. Monogram was the first company I remember in 1/24 scale. Others followed. Do you know why model companies switched from 1/25 to 1/24 scale?

I've no idea Ed.  What I do know that strictly from a nostalgic perspective, 1:25 model kits and promotional models were what I collected as a kid from age 8 until I was 20 years old.  There was no diecast in those days to speak of from a collector vantage point.  My collection of plastic cars were melted to my bedroom wall in a 1971 house fire.  The smell was horrific from the melted plastic, but worse than that, I'd lost my collection.  It wasn't until 1989 when I saw a Danbury Mint newspaper ad for their '57 Chevy Belaire convertible in 1:24 scale diecast.  I was addicted immediately.  

George Schire
Oakdale, Minnesota


   
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John Quilter
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Terrible way to loose a collection.  Condolences.

John F. Quilter
Eugene, Oregon USA


   
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