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Resin Models integrity of build

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Chazy.R
(@chazy-r)
Reputable Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 109
Topic starter  

I think the issue of white metal vs resin has been discussed many times. This post is not to pit one against the other. My preference will always be for the white metal’s lasting ability Brooklin models is a good example of oldie but goodie still in tact. I love and appreciate the numerous new model choices in resin and I have many to fill in gaps where the white metals are missing. I personally love the heft and presence of WMCE, Conquest, Motor City USA, etc. The fine detailing offered in the resins are amazing. The reason for this post, many of the fine details offered in the resins are so delicate and don’t stay on. I just unpacked a Neo 56 Pontiac and had wind wings of/loose and the wipers. I purchased a 1962 Impala with a detached rocker panel for a discounted price and I was able to fix it. I am not sure if many of you may or will be experiencing theses disappointments. I recently detailed the new Brooklin Rivieras and the minute chrome details are great but, in my opinion are candidates to come off sometime in the future. I wonder if the term, ‘less is more’ is appropriate.

let me be clear, I am not ranting or looking for agreement or conclusions, but just wanted to share my personal observations. Thanks and regards 

 

This topic was modified 4 months ago by Chazy.R

   
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David H
(@d-m-holcombe)
Trusted Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 2049
 

Those small parts do fall off and are easily lost.  Here's a product I have found in my 1/43 kit building projects that helps:

IMG 8701

  In building model cars, I have grown to like these fast-acting glues, not for every part but for attaching those little bits.  The problems is that these glues, once opened, seem to have a short life.  It seems the shorter the drying time, the shorter the shelf life.  But this package of five mini-tubes works just fine for me, with less waste that I have found.  The glue is fast drying so that I can hold a piece into position, even an awkward placement, for long enough (perhaps a minute or two) for it to dry.  It usually needs to dry longer to better insure permanence, but that initial minute or two means no clumsy clamping is necessary.  Be warned that only a few seconds of adjustment time is available or permanent damage can result.  Experiment on some worthless items!   When it comes to gluing larger parts together that easily clamp, I still prefer the older white glue and overnight drying with clamps.  

  I enjoy these 1/43 models as construction kits.  And, yes, I build models of all sorts of materials.  I like the variety!

IMG 8702
IMG 8703

   
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Mark Lampariello
(@mark-lampariello)
Prominent Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 380
 

All of my resin models collected over the last few years, including those with PE, have held onto their parts. But don't un-plinth them.


   
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Frank Reed
(@frank)
Famed Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 1605
 

I enjoy the “charm” , weight and feel of those early Brooklins

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68CA641B A9CB 4FD6 B21C 0E6193DE365C

and to a somewhat lesser degree the Franklin Mint models

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F5071C13 DD44 421D 8A0B 3DC987A67EBD

the resin certainly can be more detailed and as result may be more delicate

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52959EB9 0163 465D 8454 7E0F755D38D8

bottom line is what appeals to you and how it displays.  

Frank Reed
Chesapeake, VA


   
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Bob Jackman
(@bob-jackman)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 26 years ago
Posts: 5053
 

I used to be a white metal collector exclusively until resin came along. As has been said the feel of the weight of white metal is a plus but the detail of resin is also a plus. For me it gets down to the subject matter so the material is of secondary importance. Years ago I could never have imagined the 1/43 market being as vast as it is today and I love every minute of it.


   
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Harv Goranson
(@mg-harv)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 26 years ago
Posts: 2047
 

Re: David H's comment, super glue can fog chrome and windows, you will never get it off. So take care where you use it.

Re: White metal vs. resin 1) I have both, and 2) no one ever seems to mention diecast (zamac) anymore, but these models have their place too. I cannot imagine white metal being used for the likes of these:

EMC 1903 Cadillac tonneau pic2
Spark 43LM20 Toyota TS050 1st LM20 pic1

HPI and Kyosho made some of the best zamak models ever, wish they would return:

HPI 8051 Porsche LM98 25 & 26
Kyosho 05011R 512BB open

 


   
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Nickies
(@nickies)
Honorable Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 242
 

No more metal models for me. In my new spree of collecting, accuracy and details are more important. This is because I mostly collected 1/24 scale before and we have been spoiled by DM and FM. 


   
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Nickies
(@nickies)
Honorable Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 242
 

@mark-lampariello I remove them from the plinth to display. I rarely have an issue with PE parts. If it happens, I use clear nail polish to fix. I also have Testors Clear Parts Cement and Window Maker that is thicker but also works fine.


   
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Ed Davis
(@ed-davis)
Noble Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 1138
 

@nickies 

Thanks for recommendations about what to use for re-attaching parts.

Ed Davis
Inverness, Illinois, USA


   
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David Green
(@david-green)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 5005
 

Thanks nickies. Good ides there. I’m hesitant to use superglue.

 

 


   
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Chazy.R
(@chazy-r)
Reputable Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 109
Topic starter  

@nickies Thanks for the tips. Never thought of clear nail polish.


   
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