Dismantling a Danbu...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Dismantling a Danbury Mint 1962 Thunderbird Sports Roadster Part 2

7 Posts
6 Users
24 Likes
279 Views
Pete Rovero
(@pete-rovero)
Noble Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 966
Topic starter  

Continuing on with blowing apart a Thunderbird Sports Roadster...

Dismantling the chassis isn't very difficult.  Everything is either screwed or glued together.

IMG 6806

 

The “down” top is held in by two pins.  I use a small punch or a finishing nail and a hammer to tap the pin out.  Only one side needs to be removed to get the down top out.

The faux folded top is glued to the panel and can be easily pried off with a screwdriver.

IMG 6807 LI

 

The rear seat back is glued at the bottom and can be gently pulled free.

IMG 6808

 

The rear seat bottom is glued on both sides and can be pried up with a screwdriver.

IMG 6809

 

The front seat backs are removed by gently prying the pivot points of the seat backs from the holes located on the seat bases.

IMG 6810 LI

 

Here's how they look up close.

IMG 5168 (2) LI
IMG 5168 (3) LI

 

Remove the bottom seat cushions from their bases by gently prying with a screwdriver to break the glue bonds.

IMG 6811

 

Once the seat cushions are out the seat bases can be removed with a screwdriver

IMG 6812

 

Moving on to the engine compartment...

To remove the engine assembly, first remove the battery and other stuff attached to the chassis. Pry with a small screwdriver or utility knife to break the glue bond with the battery, washer bag, etc.

IMG 6814

 

Turning the chassis over, remove the two small Philip head screws that hold the engine in place. 

IMG 6815 LI (2)

 

Break the glue bond under the radiator and then…

IMG 6817

 

…pry on each side of the radiator to break the glue bonds there. 

IMG 6818

 

Break the glue bonds at the shock towers with a utility knife.  The cowl (or firewall) is not glued in and will come out easily.  I leave the radiator and all the hoses and wiring attached, there’s no need to disconnect them.

IMG 6819

 

Pry up the interior floor pan from the chassis to reveal a screw that holds the dash and console in place. Remove the screw and the floor pan can be removed from the chassis.  The dashboard/steering wheel assembly will remain in place and is removed once the engine is out.  Next, pry the transmission from the crossmember with a screwdriver and the engine assembly can be removed.

IMG 6828 LI (2)

The dashboard/steering shaft/ pinion gear assembly can be removed from the steering rack by careful fenagling. The yellow arrow is where the steering shaft rests. The pinion gear sits on the steering rack below that. Sorry, I didn’t get a picture of its removal. 

IMG 6829 LI
IMG 5168

So, here we are, all disassembled and nearly ready for new interior and exterior paint colors.  Hmmm... I wonder what they will be?!  Stay tuned for Part 3!


Quote
Topic Tags
john barry
(@john-barry)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 6435
 

no bobby pins ???  ..............  no gum wrappers ????............ no LOOSE CHANGE ????

.....................................THANKS PETE !!!    ,,,,,,,,,   another golden page reference post !!!!............................


Tony Perrone, Pete Rovero, Tony Perrone and 1 people reacted
ReplyQuote
Jack Dodds
(@jack-dodds)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 6778
 

Very interesting!  I admire your patience.


Tony Perrone, Pete Rovero, Tony Perrone and 1 people reacted
ReplyQuote
Rich Sufficool
(@rich-sufficool)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 2012
 

I'm dying to see where you're headed with this.


Tony Perrone, Pete Rovero, Tony Perrone and 1 people reacted
ReplyQuote
Pete Rovero
(@pete-rovero)
Noble Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 966
Topic starter  

@rich-sufficool

Be patient Rich, all will be revealed soon! 


ReplyQuote
GreatMachines
(@greatmachines)
Trusted Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 66
 

@pete-rovero Bravo! This is a fantastic sharing of experience and grows our appreciation of how meticulous these beautiful models were put together.  Sadly it also confirms why Danbury, Franklin and WCPD could not continue to produce them profitably.  They were built TOO WELL 🤷‍♂️.  We look forward to your #3 issue!


ReplyQuote
John Merritt
(@jcarnutz)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 26 years ago
Posts: 2903
 

Just amazing!

John Merritt
South Lyon, Michigan - USA


ReplyQuote
Share: