Unbending the banan...
 
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Unbending the banana


Carlo14
(@carlo14)
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Joined: 8 months ago
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Topic starter  

I remember some discussions on here a few years ago about Neo and some of their models having a drooping rear wing line.  The '58 Mercury Turnpike, '59 Oldsmobile and Jensen Healey being some of the worst examples.

I wondered if it would be possible to improve this by applying heat, so attempted it on my '58 Mercury, being as it's not the most prized model in the collection.  So off came its chassis, and I held it over an electric hob for up to a minute each time, then attempted to bend the back body upwards and hold it there while it cooled.

Wouldn't say I've cured it but it is definitely improved and no longer such an eyesore.  Am tempted to try with the 59 Olds but being a fixed head may not be as straighforward. 

First image shows the factory model and second two post the heat treatment.

Image 00
Image 9
Image 6

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Graeme Ogg
(@graeme-ogg)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 403
 

Well, that was a pretty brave move!

I've done quite a lot of model modifications and conversions but I imagined that if I applied enough heat to a resin model to be able to bend it, the resin would warp or crinkle in some horrendous fashion and the paint would come off in chunks. Or probably both.

Glad to see you got away with it. A definite improvement. I also have the Mercury, which is just about presentable, and the Olds, which looks so bad I don't even display it. But I don't feel confident enough to try your remedy on either of them. I suspect that bending the lower body on the Olds might crack the very delicate roof.

Graeme.M. Ogg
London U.K.


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Carlo14
(@carlo14)
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Topic starter  

I fear you're right with the Olds.  I have the gold 2dr HT and it's a shame as it is a very nice model otherwise.  For some reason the Mercury always bothered more.

This post was modified 6 months ago by Carlo14

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Jack Dodds
(@jack-dodds)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 6637
 

I'm surprised and happy for you that it survived the operation; those NEO bananas are hard to look at.  IMO Neo should be ashamed of themselves for such poor quality control; which is why I stopped buying them except for the odd sedan.  Btw...what is an electrical hob?


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Carlo14
(@carlo14)
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Topic starter  

That's the word we English use for the top plate of an electric oven i.e. where you put the saucepans.

This post was modified 6 months ago by Carlo14

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Bob Jackman
(@bob-jackman)
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Thanks Carlo. The Mercury looks great.


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Jack Dodds
(@jack-dodds)
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Joined: 2 years ago
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Posted by: @carlo14

That's the word we English use for the top plate of an electric oven i.e. where you put the saucepans.

Really !!!  Now I really am amazed the surgery was a success.  Well done!


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John Quilter
(@john-quilter)
Prominent Member
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A while back I got away (sort of) with straightening a 1958 Lincoln convertible, not with heat but by cutting a V shaped groove a the door shut line.  Had to touch in the paint a bit which was the downside of this operation.  Maybe better with an easier to match color. 

1958 Lincoln #2
1958 Lincoln fixed #2

Perhaps using a finer blade in the saw in this photo would have given a better result.  With a hardtop car I think it would be necessary to separate the top from the body at the C pillar area.

1958 59 Plymouth const

John F. Quilter
Eugene, Oregon USA


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John Kuvakas
(@jkuvakas)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 3830
 

I applaud your daring and bravery! As far as I can see, you've made a drastic improvement in a model that needed a lot of help. 

John Kuvakas
Warrenton, VA


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