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Do any of our master artists --or chemists--have ideas on opening up a resin model [NEO, Goldvarg, Matrix etc]

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Mark Lampariello
(@mark-lampariello)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 387
Topic starter  

There are a few I'd prefer with a lighter or body color-coordinated interior as with many 1:1 subjects.  Others could get a bit more detail.

I tried this with two older, easily replacable NEOs and the bodies shattered as if made of a thin ceramic material.  Perhaps they use a glue that can be softened with a dot of solvent at just the right spot?  I'll need to be willing to sacrifice another model that shows little demand in the marketplace for some trial and error.

Thanks for any suggestions.

 

 


   
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Dirn
 Dirn
(@dirn)
Estimable Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 39
 

Most resins are assembled using a white(clear) glue that is water soluble. You can either soak, or lightly spray the areas you want to remove.

 


   
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Christopher Moroni
(@chris)
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Joined: 26 years ago
Posts: 1683
 

Mark, although I've NEVER had to disassemble a resin model I have, however, disassembled COUNTLESS diecast, plastic, tin, metal & aluminum scale models.  I do NOT recommend using solvents, I DO recommend using:

-Sharp (new) X-acto blades.

-"Snap saw" (thin razor fine teeth).

-Micro size flat-head screw drivers.

-Needle nose plyers.

-Jewler's saw (this will cut anything like butter!)

-Toothpicks (can be filed to shape and used as tiny wedges WITHOUT damage to trim, etc..)

-A Dremel tool is nice too!

Using all or any combination from the above "tool list,"  I've yet to be stumped! 😉   In fact, I'm currently working on cutting the trunk out of a 1/18 diecast 1964 Mercury.  The Jewler's saw cuts through diecast in minutes (the masking tape held the trunk in place to ensure proper hinge alignment). 

I realize you simply want to disassemble your model but I'm all but certain that "cutting & slicing"  would be better than "dissolving & melting."   

Of course, if WHITE GLUE is used... and you can just "soak it"  ...that would be terrific! 

Mark, good luck & post pics! 😀 

-Chris

Parklane trunk 2
Parklane trunk 1

 

 

 

 

This post was modified 3 months ago by Christopher Moroni

   
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Mark Lampariello
(@mark-lampariello)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 387
Topic starter  

@chris Thanks, Dremelling sounds like the best plan. The chassis unit comes right off.  Then I'll carefully Dremel the interior pan and dashboard attatchment points from below to see if they can be worked free without cutting through them.  If the varous attachments dont do the job I'll call it a day and save the model!

Thanks for reminding me to try that Dremel which I've used on white metal and diecast projects. Growing up with both parents as organic chemists started me barking up the wrong tree for a project that was not made of metal......

This post was modified 3 months ago by Mark Lampariello

   
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Christopher Moroni
(@chris)
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@mark-lampariello No problem, we're here to help. Hopefully, you can accomplish your goal(s). 😀


   
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Karl Schnelle
(@karl)
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Posts: 1347
 

As a chemical engineer, I should be able to answer but I agree that any solvent on the paint and the resin is a huge risk.  I would buy some broken, cheap resin and experiment.  Try the warm water approach first, then the Dremel.  Everyone above had good ideas!    Let us know how it goes!


   
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Chazy.R
(@chazy-r)
Reputable Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 132
 

Hi Guys,

yes they are very brittle vans do no fair well to. Unexpected falls. Mine fell while still on the stand. Results in photos. Good news this car was a duplicate and will be used for parts to restore design studio mercs.

5629AE13 EBB0 4A91 AE0E 252BE3DFAD09
F5BEE76C A7F0 4B76 9586 45246BB47C36
38A8B756 8115 4218 A9F0 8726BFAE57E8
260AE3C0 C256 4800 B0E6 3763199E5502
0E5C2F7C 8216 4421 8E80 C43B91B57167

 


   
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