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More on issues with resin - anyone seen this?

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Harv Goranson
(@mg-harv)
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This is the Silas MG Magnette Mk. IV, originally purchased in 2015. I noticed a very slight bulge in the trim at the time, but didn't think much of it. However, seven years later look what is happening to the side trim.

Silas SM43015a MG Magnette pic5

So either the model is shrinking or the trim is expanding, the latter very unlikely. My repair idea is to get some of those p/e trim scissors I have seen in the MicroMark catalog and shorten the trim at the door line, then reglue back in place. When I get the courage to try anyway.

This topic was modified 3 months ago 2 times by Harv Goranson

   
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Moe Parr
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My NEO '58 Buick Caballero has a similar problem on one of the front fenders. I just make sure to display it with that side not visible.

Barry Levittan
Long Island, NY


   
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John Kuvakas
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I've seen that before, even on a few new ones. It's really an unusual dilemma and hard to figure out exactly what's going on. I'll tell you this, trying to make the repair look right will give you an all new appreciation for the folks that assmble these. 

John Kuvakas
Warrenton, VA


   
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Graeme Ogg
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The metal used for P/E trim will expand more with heat than resin, so in theory I suppose it is possible that even if models are not exposed to extreme heat or sunlight, warmer weather could make the trim expand enough to detach itself, and once the adhesive has given up, the trim wouldn't go back in place properly. But having said that, the amount of lengthening of that trim piece (and the fact that it hasn't shrunk back) is very surprising.

Resin is supposed to be pretty stable unless it's exposed to serious temperatures (or chemicals like paint stripper) and if it really is shrinking you might expect to see some obvious buckling of the body or the glazing.

Very odd - and a bit worrying for all us resin collectors if the material really does shrink or distort with age (swelling and cracking was the more usual problem with the older plastics).

 

Graeme.M. Ogg
London U.K.


   
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John Merritt
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I have this on several models. I usually lift the remaining trim off, resize, if necessary, but usually it isn't. Reglue. This isn't an easy repair for me these days as my hands don't handle these small details well anymore. 

Now as far as the painted trim on GLM/Stamo newer releases, I am good with it, it may not be as "shiney", but this problem doesn't exist.

John Merritt
South Lyon, Michigan - USA


   
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Jack Dodds
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I have had this problem with all brands of resin models but far more with NEO.  I simply pop off the trim piece in question carefully and reglue it.  I have found that trying to tuck glue in behind the bowed out trim piece is messy and problematic.  My impression is that this problem is mainly created by inadequate gluing during factory assembly, as my inspection of the problem area usually shows a shortage of glue residue.


   
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Graeme Ogg
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Yes, I think the problem is that in trying to avoid unsightly excess adhesive being squeezed out and marking the paintwork, they went too far the other way and applied too little. The natural springiness of the P/E metal then does the damage.

Another problem is that in some cases I think they have tried to avoid the "runny glue" problem by giving the model assemblers P/E components with "instant-grab" glue pre-applied, and if they don't get them perfectly positioned at the first attempt the trim piece either gets kinked when they try to re-align it, or the repositioned section never quite adheres properly, causing problems later.

Nicely done P/E trim can look great but it's not much fun when it falls off models that aren't even being handled.

This post was modified 3 months ago by Graeme Ogg

Graeme.M. Ogg
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Harv Goranson
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Another view. Note the close proximity of the side trim to the front and rear lights. If the metal was warping you would think there would be more space. On the other hand, if the resin is shrinking, there would be warpage elsewhere which is not the case. Puzzling.

Silas SM43015a MG Magnette pic4

   
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Ed Davis
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@jack-dodds 

I agree with you about inadequate gluing. I had similar problems on a Matrix 1949 Chrysler Town & Country convertible and NEO/American Excellence 1958 Buick station wagon. Such tiny amount of adhesive must have been used, no adhesive residue was visible. Also, gluing to a painted surface does not help. I remember the instructions with all those plastic model kits. They reminded you to scrape paint from surfaces where glue would be applied for proper adhesion. Unfortunately, this might not be possible for resin cars.

Ed Davis
Inverness, Illinois, USA


   
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Ben Lampson
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Yup Harv....I have one also, and surprisingly, it is a recent GLM! The lower chrome trim on both sides of my GLM 1952 Cadillac roadster....and also the lower chrome trim around the bottom of the right rear quarter panel just popped off all together....I am very surprised this happened on a GLM.

I figure it won't be difficult to fix these issues though.

20220830 134816
20220830 134430

 


   
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John Kuvakas
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The hard part to figure out is how a trim piece can be attached on both ends and warped in the middle with no discernible gaps on either end. Why or how would the trim "expand" tht much?

John Kuvakas
Warrenton, VA


   
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Karl Schnelle
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Yes, very puzzling.  I assume you can't push it back against the side of the car? So the trim MUST have expanded? If the body is in fine shape..


   
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Jack Dodds
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@jkuvakas John; I suspect that perhaps the trim piece wasn't laid completely flat when it was initially glued.  In haste would be very easy to make this error.


   
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Graeme Ogg
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I am inclined to attribute this mysterious problem to the effects of quantum foam, which is a theoretical fluctuation of spacetime on very small scales due to quantum mechanics.

By the way, I’ve learned never to trust quantum mechanics. They are supposed to be the go-to people if you need a really small job doing. Trouble is, you can never be entirely sure what they’re up to. For example, you might need a new cat fitted to your car. Schroedinger is a well-known brand, but even when they swear blind they’ve installed it, have they really?  I’m in two minds about it. (Just a GUT feeling).

Graeme.M. Ogg
London U.K.


   
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Ben Lampson
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Posted by: @graeme-ogg

a theoretical fluctuation of spacetime on very small scales

Only microscopic black holes can cause that kind of fluctuation Graeme.....good luck finding those! 😋 


   
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